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But do thy worst to steal thyself away, For term of life thou art assured mine; And life no longer than thy love will stay, For it depends upon that love of thine. Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs, When in the least of them my life hath end. I see a better state to me belongs Than that which on thy humour doth depend: Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind, Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie. O what a happy title do I find, Happy to have thy love, happy to die!      But what's so blessed-fair that fears no blot?      Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.   Analysis In Sonnet 92, the poet claims not to care if his lover is untrue, as discovering this will kill him, ridding him of care. Will goads his lover to go ahead...

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From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding. ???Pity the world, or else this glutton be, ???To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee. Analysis Sonnet 1 bids the subject, a handsome young man, to create an heir so that he might taste immortality. Shakespeare begins by exalting the young man’s physical beauty, before changing to a tone of contempt for his lack of a desire for an heir.Then, the sonnet shifts from a tone of admiration to a critical tone. Bill accuses the young man of...

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When forty winters shall beseige thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held: Then being ask'd where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes, Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise. How much more praise deserved thy beauty's use, If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,' Proving his beauty by succession thine!      This were to be new made when thou art old,      And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold. Analysis Sonnet 2 is a procreation sonnet that emphasizes the ruin of age, and how the beauty of the subject’s youth could be preserved in a child. Shakespeare’s beloved is clearly handsome, and much desired. But he stresses that...

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  Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time that face should form another; Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest, Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother. For where is she so fair whose uneared womb Disdains the tillage of thy husbandry? Or who is he so fond will be the tomb Of his self-love, to stop posterity? Thou art thy mother's glass and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime; So thou through windows of thine age shalt see, Despite of wrinkles, this thy golden time.      But if thou live, remembered not to be,      Die single and thine image dies with thee.   Analysis Sonnet 3 emphasizes the ravages age might take on the young man, explaining how beauty is passed on through the generations, from his forbears to him, and so on. Will once again urges his subject to look...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 7

Lo! in the orient when the gracious light Lifts up his burning head, each under eye Doth homage to his new-appearing sight, Serving with looks his sacred majesty; And having climbed the steep-up heavenly hill, Resembling strong youth in his middle age, Yet mortal looks adore his beauty still, Attending on his golden pilgrimage: But when from highmost pitch, with weary car, Like feeble age, he reeleth from the day, The eyes, 'fore duteous, now converted are From his low tract, and look another way:      So thou, thyself outgoing in thy noon      Unlooked on diest unless thou get a son.   Analysis Sonnet 7 draws a simile between the rising and setting sun and the human life cycle. In the sunset of his days, the youth will no longer be surrounded by admirers. Unless he has children to carry on the line and reflect his former beauty, he will be forgotten by time....

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Play Sonnet 8

  Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly? Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy. Why lovest thou that which thou receivest not gladly, Or else receivest with pleasure thine annoy? If the true concord of well-tuned sounds, By unions married, do offend thine ear, They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear. Mark how one string, sweet husband to another, Strikes each in each by mutual ordering, Resembling sire and child and happy mother Who all in one, one pleasing note do sing:      Whose speechless song, being many, seeming one,      Sings this to thee: 'thou single wilt prove none.   Analysis Sonnet 8 is another procreation sonnet urging the young man to whom it is addressed to marry and have children. A comparison is made between the harmony of different instruments in an orchestra, voices in unison, and...

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  Is it for fear to wet a widow's eye That thou consumest thyself in single life? Ah! if thou issueless shalt hap to die, The world will wail thee, like a makeless wife; The world will be thy widow and still weep That thou no form of thee hast left behind, When every private widow well may keep By children's eyes her husband's shape in mind. Look what an unthrift in the world doth spend Shifts but his place, for still the world enjoys it; But beauty's waste hath in the world an end, And kept unused, the user so destroys it.      No love toward others in that bosom sits      That on himself such murderous shame commits.   Analysis Sonnet 9 approaches the young man’s resistance to marry and procreate as a fear of hurting his family after he dies. Here, Bill Shakes tries a different tack. He reasons that if the young...

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Play Sonnet 10

  For shame deny that thou bear'st love to any, Who for thyself art so unprovident. Grant, if thou wilt, thou art beloved of many, But that thou none lovest is most evident; For thou art so possess'd with murderous hate That 'gainst thyself thou stick'st not to conspire. Seeking that beauteous roof to ruinate Which to repair should be thy chief desire. O, change thy thought, that I may change my mind! Shall hate be fairer lodged than gentle love? Be, as thy presence is, gracious and kind, Or to thyself at least kind-hearted prove:      Make thee another self, for love of me,      That beauty still may live in thine or thee. Analysis Sonnet 10 gets personal. The poet uses a rather harsh tone to admonish the beloved for his refusal to fall in love and have children.-- “Do it for me” For the first time, Billy mentions a personal relationship between...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 14

  Not from the stars do I my judgement pluck; And yet methinks I have Astronomy, But not to tell of good or evil luck, Of plagues, of dearths, or seasons' quality; Nor can I fortune to brief minutes tell, Pointing to each his thunder, rain and wind, Or say with princes if it shall go well By oft predict that I in heaven find: But from thine eyes my knowledge I derive, And, constant stars, in them I read such art As truth and beauty shall together thrive, If from thyself, to store thou wouldst convert;      Or else of thee this I prognosticate:      Thy end is truth's and beauty's doom and date. Analysis Sonnet 14 varies the procreation theme, tying it in with predictions of the future made, not through tracking the stars in the heavens as would normally be expected, but through taking the youth's eyes as stars which foretell the...

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Play Sonnet 15

  When I consider every thing that grows Holds in perfection but a little moment, That this huge stage presenteth nought but shows Whereon the stars in secret influence comment; When I perceive that men as plants increase, Cheered and checked even by the self-same sky, Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease, And wear their brave state out of memory; Then the conceit of this inconstant stay Sets you most rich in youth before my sight, Where wasteful Time debateth with decay To change your day of youth to sullied night,      And all in war with Time for love of you,      As he takes from you, I engraft you new. Analysis Sonnet 15 warns the beautiful young man that even though he is beautiful, the whole world is in a constant war to preserve beauty.The poet strives to immortalize his dear friend in verse, thereby saving him from the ravages of all-consuming Time. The opening thought touches...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 17

Who will believe my verse in time to come, If it were filled with your most high deserts? Though yet heaven knows it is but as a tomb Which hides your life, and shows not half your parts. If I could write the beauty of your eyes, And in fresh numbers number all your graces, The age to come would say 'This poet lies; Such heavenly touches ne'er touched earthly faces.' So should my papers, yellowed with their age, Be scorned, like old men of less truth than tongue, And your true rights be termed a poet's rage And stretched metre of an antique song:      But were some child of yours alive that time,      You should live twice, in it, and in my rhyme.   Analysis Sonnet 17 is the last of the procreation sonnets, and the poet’s ast thought is to question his own descriptions of the beloved, believing that...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 19

  Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion's paws, And make the earth devour her own sweet brood; Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger's jaws, And burn the long-lived phoenix in her blood; Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleet'st, And do whate'er thou wilt, swift-footed Time, To the wide world and all her fading sweets; But I forbid thee one most heinous crime: O! carve not with thy hours my love's fair brow, Nor draw no lines there with thine antique pen; Him in thy course untainted do allow For beauty's pattern to succeeding men.      Yet, do thy worst old Time: despite thy wrong,      My love shall in my verse ever live young.   Analysis Sonnet 19 treats the theme of redemption of time through art-- for there immortality lies. Billy directly addresses Time, and lists all of the conventional damage Time does which is customary and known to...

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Play Sonnet 20

A woman's face with nature's own hand painted, Hast thou, the master mistress of my passion; A woman's gentle heart, but not acquainted With shifting change, as is false women's fashion: An eye more bright than theirs, less false in rolling, Gilding the object whereupon it gazeth; A man in hue all hues in his controlling, Which steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth. And for a woman wert thou first created; Till Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting, And by addition me of thee defeated, By adding one thing to my purpose nothing.      But since she prick'd thee out for women's pleasure,      Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure.   Analysis Sonnet 20 compares the fair youth’s appearance to that of a woman, and says its a pity for a male admirer to be unable to partner him Will’s subject is “the master-mistress of passion”. He has the grace...

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Play Sonnet 22

My glass shall not persuade me I am old, So long as youth and thou are of one date; But when in thee time's furrows I behold, Then look I death my days should expiate. For all that beauty that doth cover thee, Is but the seemly raiment of my heart, Which in thy breast doth live, as thine in me: How can I then be elder than thou art? O! therefore, love, be of thyself so wary As I, not for myself, but for thee will; Bearing thy heart, which I will keep so chary As tender nurse her babe from faring ill.      Presume not on thy heart when mine is slain,      Thou gav'st me thine not to give back again.   Analysis Sonnet 22 is a romantic image of the literal exchange of lovers’ hearts, and how the effect of each lover’s health therefore touches the well-being of the other. Bill...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 24

Mine eye hath played the painter and hath steeled, Thy beauty's form in table of my heart; My body is the frame wherein 'tis held, And perspective that is best painter's art. For through the painter must you see his skill, To find where your true image pictured lies, Which in my bosom's shop is hanging still, That hath his windows glazed with thine eyes. Now see what good turns eyes for eyes have done: Mine eyes have drawn thy shape, and thine for me Are windows to my breast, where-through the sun Delights to peep, to gaze therein on thee;      Yet eyes this cunning want to grace their art,      They draw but what they see, know not the heart.   Analysis Sonnet 24 is a giant artistic metaphor to say that affection is more than skin deep. Like a painter, Willy has painted his lover’s image on his heart, and framing the...

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Play Sonnet 25

Let those who are in favour with their stars Of public honour and proud titles boast, Whilst I, whom fortune of such triumph bars Unlook'd for joy in that I honour most. Great princes' favourites their fair leaves spread But as the marigold at the sun's eye, And in themselves their pride lies buried, For at a frown they in their glory die. The painful warrior famoused for fight, After a thousand victories once foiled, Is from the book of honour razed quite, And all the rest forgot for which he toiled:      Then happy I, that love and am beloved, Where I may not remove nor be removed. Analysis Sonnet 25 compares the joys of fickleness of fate, flowers, and courtly favors with the steadfastness found in the joy brought by the beloved. While those who have been favored by fortune boast about it; Shakespeare is hindered by it but, happy...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Video 31 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 32

If thou survive my well-contented day, When that churl Death my bones with dust shall cover And shalt by fortune once more re-survey These poor rude lines of thy deceased lover, Compare them with the bett'ring of the time, And though they be outstripped by every pen, Reserve them for my love, not for their rhyme, Exceeded by the height of happier men. O! then vouchsafe me but this loving thought: 'Had my friend's Muse grown with this growing age, A dearer birth than this his love had brought, To march in ranks of better equipage:      But since he died and poets better prove,      Theirs for their style I'll read, his for his love'.   Analysis Sonnet 32 explores themes on the length of life, and life as a house Shakespeare looks into the future and reflects that the young man will probably outlive him. He bids the young man to remember the him...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 34

Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day, And make me travel forth without my cloak, To let base clouds o'ertake me in my way, Hiding thy bravery in their rotten smoke? 'Tis not enough that through the cloud thou break, To dry the rain on my storm-beaten face, For no man well of such a salve can speak, That heals the wound, and cures not the disgrace: Nor can thy shame give physic to my grief; Though thou repent, yet I have still the loss: The offender's sorrow lends but weak relief To him that bears the strong offence's cross.      Ah! but those tears are pearl which thy love sheds,      And they are rich and ransom all ill deeds.   Analysis Sonnet 34 compares broken promises from a lover to an unexpected cloudburst. Apologies might be too little too late, but Shakespeare accuses his beloved offering him warmth and love, causing...

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Play Sonnet 35

No more be grieved at that which thou hast done: Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud: Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud. All men make faults, and even I in this, Authorizing thy trespass with compare, Myself corrupting, salving thy amiss, Excusing thy sins more than thy sins are; For to thy sensual fault I bring in sense, Thy adverse party is thy advocate, And 'gainst myself a lawful plea commence: Such civil war is in my love and hate,      That I an accessary needs must be,      To that sweet thief which sourly robs from me.   Analysis Sonnet 35 begs its subject, who has committed some kind of wrong, not to feel sorry, and argues so well in the injurers offense that the injured is hurting himself Here, William beseeches his love not to apologize for what he...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Video 37 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 38

How can my muse want subject to invent, While thou dost breathe, that pour'st into my verse Thine own sweet argument, too excellent For every vulgar paper to rehearse? O! give thy self the thanks, if aught in me Worthy perusal stand against thy sight; For who's so dumb that cannot write to thee, When thou thy self dost give invention light? Be thou the tenth Muse, ten times more in worth Than those old nine which rhymers invocate; And he that calls on thee, let him bring forth Eternal numbers to outlive long date.      If my slight muse do please these curious days,      The pain be mine, but thine shall be the praise.   Analysis Sonnet 38 again praises the fair young man for his inspiring beauty, an almost superhuman force, and suggests the young man take all the credit for the poetry written about him. Bill asks how he can look...

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Video 39 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 40

  Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all; What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call; All mine was thine, before thou hadst this more. Then, if for my love, thou my love receivest, I cannot blame thee, for my love thou usest; But yet be blam'd, if thou thy self deceivest By wilful taste of what thyself refusest. I do forgive thy robbery, gentle thief, Although thou steal thee all my poverty: And yet, love knows it is a greater grief To bear love's wrong, than hate's known injury.      Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows,      Kill me with spites yet we must not be foes.   Analysis Sonnet 40 sees the poet’s loved one, likely the fair youth, has stolen his mistress, but the poet forgives him. Willy asks his beloved why he would seduce another...

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Play Sonnet 41

  Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits, When I am sometime absent from thy heart, Thy beauty, and thy years full well befits, For still temptation follows where thou art. Gentle thou art, and therefore to be won, Beauteous thou art, therefore to be assailed; And when a woman woos, what woman's son Will sourly leave her till he have prevailed? Ay me! but yet thou mightst my seat forbear, And chide thy beauty and thy straying youth, Who lead thee in their riot even there Where thou art forced to break a twofold truth:      Hers by thy beauty tempting her to thee,      Thine by thy beauty being false to me.   Analysis Sonnet 41 justifies a crime of unfaithfulness by blaming the subject’s beauty as the culprit, but the poet is reproachful, suggesting that the young man might still have shown a little respect. Billy’s lover's crime has been justified with a list of extenuating...

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Video 42 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 43

When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see, For all the day they view things unrespected; But when I sleep, in dreams they look on thee, And darkly bright, are bright in dark directed. Then thou, whose shadow shadows doth make bright, How would thy shadow's form form happy show To the clear day with thy much clearer light, When to unseeing eyes thy shade shines so! How would, I say, mine eyes be blessed made By looking on thee in the living day, When in dead night thy fair imperfect shade Through heavy sleep on sightless eyes doth stay!      All days are nights to see till I see thee,      And nights bright days when dreams do show thee me.   Analysis Sonnet 43 sees the poet and his lover apart, and uses imagery of bright nights and dark days to describe dreams of his love. All day Willy is forced to...

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Play Sonnet 44

  If the dull substance of my flesh were thought, Injurious distance should not stop my way; For then despite of space I would be brought, From limits far remote, where thou dost stay. No matter then although my foot did stand Upon the farthest earth removed from thee; For nimble thought can jump both sea and land As soon as think the place where he would be. But ah! thought kills me that I am not thought, To leap large lengths of miles when thou art gone, But that, so much of earth and water wrought, I must attend time's leisure with my moan,      Receiving nought by elements so slow      But heavy tears, badges of either's woe.   Analysis In Sonnet 44, the speaker wishes he could move with at the speed of thought to his lover’s side, but must content himself with waiting. If Willy could travel with the ease and...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 46

Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war, How to divide the conquest of thy sight; Mine eye my heart thy picture's sight would bar, My heart mine eye the freedom of that right. My heart doth plead that thou in him dost lie, A closet never pierced with crystal eyes, But the defendant doth that plea deny, And says in him thy fair appearance lies. To 'cide this title is impannelled A quest of thoughts, all tenants to the heart; And by their verdict is determined The clear eye's moiety, and the dear heart's part:      As thus: mine eye's due is thine outward part,      And my heart's right, thine inward love of heart.   Analysis Sonnet 46 wrestles with the age-old question: which is it, outer beauty or inner? Will’s heart wants one thing, emotional love, while his eye wants to drink in physical beauty. While the eye fixates on the physical...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Video 48 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Video 49 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 50

How heavy do I journey on the way, 
When what I seek, my weary travel's end, 
Doth teach that ease and that repose to say, 
'Thus far the miles are measured from thy friend!' 
The beast that bears me, tired with my woe, Plods dully on, to bear that weight in me, As if by some instinct the wretch did know His rider lov'd not speed being made from thee. The bloody spur cannot provoke him on, That sometimes anger thrusts into his hide, Which heavily he answers with a groan, More sharp to me than spurring to his side;      For that same groan doth put this in my mind,      My grief lies onward, and my joy behind.   Analysis Sonnet 50 has the speaker on a journey, parted from his love, and every step increases his sadness. Will is on a journey, traveling on horseback. Every step takes him farther from...

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Play Sonnet 51

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed: From where thou art why should I haste me thence? Till I return, of posting is no need. O! what excuse will my poor beast then find, When swift extremity can seem but slow? Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind, In winged speed no motion shall I know, Then can no horse with my desire keep pace. Therefore desire, (of perfect'st love being made) Shall neigh, no dull flesh, in his fiery race; But love, for love, thus shall excuse my jade-      Since from thee going, he went wilful-slow,      Towards thee I'll run, and give him leave to go.   Analysis Sonnet 51 sees the speaker on a journey away from his love on a slow horse, and dreaming of the day he will swiftly return. Will asks his love if the horse can...

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Play Sonnet 52

  So am I as the rich, whose blessed key, Can bring him to his sweet up-locked treasure, The which he will not every hour survey, For blunting the fine point of seldom pleasure. Therefore are feasts so solemn and so rare, Since, seldom coming in the long year set, Like stones of worth they thinly placed are, Or captain jewels in the carcanet. So is the time that keeps you as my chest, Or as the wardrobe which the robe doth hide, To make some special instant special-blest, By new unfolding his imprisoned pride.      Blessed are you whose worthiness gives scope,      Being had, to triumph, being lacked, to hope.   Analysis Sonnet 52 sees the beloved as a commodity to be squirreled away, enjoyed sparingly, and envied by friends Billy compares himself to a miser hoarding treasure. His beloved youth is like a jewel, a stored treasure, a rich garment, a rare feast day, but his rarity means...

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Play Sonnet 53

What is your substance, whereof are you made, That millions of strange shadows on you tend? Since every one hath, every one, one shade, And you but one, can every shadow lend. Describe Adonis, and the counterfeit Is poorly imitated after you; On Helen's cheek all art of beauty set, And you in Grecian tires are painted new: Speak of the spring, and foison of the year, The one doth shadow of your beauty show, The other as your bounty doth appear; And you in every blessed shape we know.      In all external grace you have some part,      But you like none, none you, for constant heart.   Analysis Sonnet 53 claims that all that is good in the world is just a reflection of the beloved’s wonderful qualities. Willy wonders aloud what the young man is made of that allows his reflection to appear in myriad ways? Normal people have only one shadow, but this splendid young fellow is reflected...

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Play Sonnet 54

  O! how much more doth beauty beauteous seem By that sweet ornament which truth doth give. The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem For that sweet odour, which doth in it live. The canker blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses: But, for their virtue only is their show, They live unwoo'd, and unrespected fade; Die to themselves. Sweet roses do not so; Of their sweet deaths are sweetest odours made:      And so of you, beauteous and lovely youth,      When that shall vade, my verse distills your truth.   Analysis Sonnet 54 espouses that truest beauty is the kind to leave something after it is gone, in this case the poetry inspired by the beloved. Bill opines how much more beautiful beauty is when it is true. The rose is...

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Play Sonnet 55

Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme; But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone, besmear'd with sluttish time. When wasteful war shall statues overturn, And broils root out the work of masonry, Nor Mars his sword, nor war's quick fire shall burn The living record of your memory. 'Gainst death, and all oblivious enmity Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room Even in the eyes of all posterity That wear this world out to the ending doom.      So, till the judgment that yourself arise,      You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.   Analysis Sonnet 55 promises the beloved that absolutely nothing time or man can do will impede his immortality in verse and the hearts of those who remember. Shakespeare makes some very big promises here. His words will outlive stone monuments, the young man flattered...

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Video 56 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 57

Being your slave what should I do but tend Upon the hours, and times of your desire? I have no precious time at all to spend; Nor services to do, till you require. Nor dare I chide the world without end hour, Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you, Nor think the bitterness of absence sour, When you have bid your servant once adieu; Nor dare I question with my jealous thought Where you may be, or your affairs suppose, But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought Save, where you are, how happy you make those.      So true a fool is love, that in your will,      Though you do anything, he thinks no ill.   Analysis In Sonnet 57, the poet is portrayed as a content slave to love. Bill counts himself as a slave, bound to wait upon the youth. He has nothing to do with his time until he is asked. He does not grow angry...

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Play Sonnet 58

That god forbid, that made me first your slave, I should in thought control your times of pleasure, Or at your hand the account of hours to crave, Being your vassal, bound to stay your leisure! O! let me suffer, being at your beck, The imprison'd absence of your liberty; And patience, tame to sufferance, bide each check, Without accusing you of injury. Be where you list, your charter is so strong That you yourself may privilege your time To what you will; to you it doth belong Yourself to pardon of self-doing crime.      I am to wait, though waiting so be hell,      Not blame your pleasure be it ill or well.   Analysis Sonnet 58 sees the poet an emotionally enslaved lover, the object of his affections behaving wantonly while he quietly suffers, unquestioning. Willy prays that the god of love who emotionally enslaved him to the youth also keeps him from ever getting too controlling. He doesn’t want to...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 61

Is it thy will, thy image should keep open My heavy eyelids to the weary night? Dost thou desire my slumbers should be broken, While shadows like to thee do mock my sight? Is it thy spirit that thou send'st from thee So far from home into my deeds to pry, To find out shames and idle hours in me, The scope and tenor of thy jealousy? O, no! thy love, though much, is not so great: It is my love that keeps mine eye awake: Mine own true love that doth my rest defeat, To play the watchman ever for thy sake:      For thee watch I, whilst thou dost wake elsewhere,      From me far off, with others all too near.   Analysis Sonnet 61 describes a sleepless night where the poet cannot stop thinking about the far-off beloved, and whose company he might be keeping. Will asks the young man...

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Play Sonnet 62

Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye And all my soul, and all my every part; And for this sin there is no remedy, It is so grounded inward in my heart. Methinks no face so gracious is as mine, No shape so true, no truth of such account; And for myself mine own worth do define, As I all other in all worths surmount. But when my glass shows me myself indeed Beated and chopp'd with tanned antiquity, Mine own self-love quite contrary I read; Self so self-loving were iniquity.      'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,      Painting my age with beauty of thy days.   Analysis Sonnet 62 explores themes of self-love and seeing the love in yourself-- is there really a difference? Billy admits he is extremely vain person, proud both of his outward form and personality. This sin, furthermore, is so deeply rooted that he believes it can’t ever...

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Play Sonnet 63

Against my love shall be as I am now, With Time's injurious hand crushed and o'erworn; When hours have drained his blood and filled his brow With lines and wrinkles; when his youthful morn Hath travelled on to age's steepy night; And all those beauties whereof now he's king Are vanishing, or vanished out of sight, Stealing away the treasure of his spring; For such a time do I now fortify Against confounding age's cruel knife, That he shall never cut from memory My sweet love's beauty, though my lover's life:      His beauty shall in these black lines be seen,      And they shall live, and he in them still green.   Analysis Sonnet 63 pits the immortality of words against Time’s never ending destruction. Will wonders about when the young man will be crushed and worn out by time. When the youth is marred and wrinkled and has reached the evening of his...

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Play Sonnet 64

    When I have seen by Time's fell hand defaced The rich proud cost of outworn buried age; When sometime lofty towers I see down-razed, And brass eternal slave to mortal rage; When I have seen the hungry ocean gain Advantage on the kingdom of the shore, And the firm soil win of the watery main, Increasing store with loss, and loss with store; When I have seen such interchange of state, Or state itself confounded to decay; Ruin hath taught me thus to ruminate That Time will come and take my love away.      This thought is as a death which cannot choose      But weep to have that which it fears to lose.   Analysis Sonnet 64 details the ravages of Time and reminds us that all things, even love, can be taken from us. Shakespeare has seen Time’s hand deface splendid monuments to men from ages past, tear down lofty towers, oceans encroach upon the land and vice versa, all things...

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Play Sonnet 65

  Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea, But sad mortality o'ersways their power, How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea, Whose action is no stronger than a flower? O! how shall summer's honey breath hold out, Against the wrackful siege of battering days, When rocks impregnable are not so stout, Nor gates of steel so strong but Time decays? O fearful meditation! where, alack, Shall Time's best jewel from Time's chest lie hid? Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back? Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid?      O! none, unless this miracle have might,      That in black ink my love may still shine bright.   Analysis Sonnet 65 bemoans the ravages of time on beauty, and our impotence to stop it. Bill admits that no earthly force or material is strong enough to resist mortality, so how can beauty possibly hope to resist death? It is as delicate as a flower. How could...

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Play Sonnet 66

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry, As to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forsworn, And gilded honour shamefully misplaced, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgraced, And strength by limping sway disabled And art made tongue-tied by authority, And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill, And simple truth miscalled simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill:      Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,      Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. Analysis Sonnet 66 laments how false people are, deeming the world not worth living in. Will is tired and wishes for the quiet of death. The world presents him only with deserving people begging, worthless people with wealth, sacred vows broken, rewards and honors bestowed on the wrong people, chaste women turned into whores, and a host of other examples of good enslaved by evil. Will would happily...

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Play Sonnet 67

Ah! wherefore with infection should he live, And with his presence grace impiety, That sin by him advantage should achieve, And lace itself with his society? Why should false painting imitate his cheek, And steal dead seeming of his living hue? Why should poor beauty indirectly seek Roses of shadow, since his rose is true? Why should he live, now Nature bankrupt is, Beggared of blood to blush through lively veins? For she hath no exchequer now but his, And proud of many, lives upon his gains.      O! him she stores, to show what wealth she had      In days long since, before these last so bad.   Analysis Sonnet 67 questions why Nature allows false things to mimic the beloved’s beauty and goodness, and how the beloved can even remain alive in such a den of sin as this world. Bill wonder why the for whom he has such affection lives in such moral...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 69

Those parts of thee that the world's eye doth view Want nothing that the thought of hearts can mend; All tongues, the voice of souls, give thee that due, Uttering bare truth, even so as foes commend. Thy outward thus with outward praise is crown'd; But those same tongues, that give thee so thine own, In other accents do this praise confound By seeing farther than the eye hath shown. They look into the beauty of thy mind, And that in guess they measure by thy deeds; Then, churls, their thoughts, although their eyes were kind, To thy fair flower add the rank smell of weeds:      But why thy odour matcheth not thy show,      The soil is this, that thou dost common grow.   Analysis Sonnet 69 expresses extremes of feelings about the beloved subject, who is presented as at once superlative in every way and treacherous or disloyal. Will admits that what the...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 71

  No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell: Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it, for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe. O! if, I say, you look upon this verse, When I perhaps compounded am with clay, Do not so much as my poor name rehearse; But let your love even with my life decay;      Lest the wise world should look into your moan,      And mock you with me after I am gone.   Analysis Sonnet 71 requests that the beloved not mourn the poet’s death if it would bring sadness or shame to him. Willy bids the young man not to mourn...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 73

That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In me thou see'st the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west; Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire, That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed, whereon it must expire, Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by.      This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong,      To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.   Analysis Sonnet 73 paints a picture of the poet on the brink of death, and thanks the beloved for being accepting. William imagines that looking at him must resemble an image of...

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Play Sonnet 74

But be contented when that fell arrest Without all bail shall carry me away, My life hath in this line some interest, Which for memorial still with thee shall stay. When thou reviewest this, thou dost review The very part was consecrate to thee: The earth can have but earth, which is his due; My spirit is thine, the better part of me: So then thou hast but lost the dregs of life, The prey of worms, my body being dead; The coward conquest of a wretch's knife, Too base of thee to be remembered.      The worth of that is that which it contains,      And that is this, and this with thee remains.   Analysis Sonnet 74 contemplates the separation and values of the soul and body to one who loves you. Shakespeare asks his beloved, as though in mid-conversation, not to be upset when death arrives and carries him off. His life will...

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Play Sonnet 75

So are you to my thoughts as food to life, Or as sweet-season'd showers are to the ground; And for the peace of you I hold such strife As 'twixt a miser and his wealth is found. Now proud as an enjoyer, and anon Doubting the filching age will steal his treasure; Now counting best to be with you alone, Then better'd that the world may see my pleasure: Sometime all full with feasting on your sight, And by and by clean starved for a look; Possessing or pursuing no delight Save what is had, or must from you be took.      Thus do I pine and surfeit day by day,      Or gluttoning on all, or all away.   Analysis In Sonnet 75, the poet expresses pleasure in the presence of his beloved, but that his devotion makes him a miser, filled with anxiety and pleasure. Billy calls the youth his nourishment, the thing that...

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Play Sonnet 76

Why is my verse so barren of new pride, So far from variation or quick change? Why with the time do I not glance aside To new-found methods, and to compounds strange? Why write I still all one, ever the same, And keep invention in a noted weed, That every word doth almost tell my name, Showing their birth, and where they did proceed? O! know sweet love I always write of you, And you and love are still my argument; So all my best is dressing old words new, Spending again what is already spent:      For as the sun is daily new and old,      So is my love still telling what is told.   Analysis Sonnet 76 examines the issue of the poet's obsession with the Youth as the repeated and sole theme of his poetry. Shakespeare expresses frustration with his poetry; that it is repetitive and he can't find inspiration. He ponders...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 80

O! how I faint when I of you do write, Knowing a better spirit doth use your name, And in the praise thereof spends all his might, To make me tongue-tied speaking of your fame. But since your worth, wide as the ocean is, The humble as the proudest sail doth bear, My saucy bark, inferior far to his, On your broad main doth wilfully appear. Your shallowest help will hold me up afloat, Whilst he upon your soundless deep doth ride; Or, being wracked, I am a worthless boat, He of tall building, and of goodly pride: Then if he thrive and I be cast away, The worst was this, my love was my decay. Analysis Sonnet 80 pits the poet’s love against the writings of his higher-favored rival. Billy is discouraged writing about his subject, since another, better poet also praises the youth’s grandeur. But, he reasons, the youth...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 90

Then hate me when thou wilt; if ever, now; Now, while the world is bent my deeds to cross, Join with the spite of fortune, make me bow, And do not drop in for an after-loss: Ah! do not, when my heart hath 'scaped this sorrow, Come in the rearward of a conquered woe; Give not a windy night a rainy morrow, To linger out a purposed overthrow. If thou wilt leave me, do not leave me last, When other petty griefs have done their spite, But in the onset come: so shall I taste At first the very worst of fortune's might;      And other strains of woe, which now seem woe,      Compared with loss of thee, will not seem so. Analysis In Sonnet 90, the poet begs for a swift, if poorly timed, end to his relationship. Will bids his love to hate him if he so wishes,...

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Play Sonnet 91

Some glory in their birth, some in their skill, Some in their wealth, some in their body's force, Some in their garments though new-fangled ill; Some in their hawks and hounds, some in their horse; And every humour hath his adjunct pleasure, Wherein it finds a joy above the rest: But these particulars are not my measure, All these I better in one general best. Thy love is better than high birth to me, Richer than wealth, prouder than garments' cost, Of more delight than hawks and horses be; And having thee, of all men's pride I boast:      Wretched in this alone, that thou mayst take      All this away, and me most wretched make.   Analysis Sonnet 91 describes the pride you can take in one who loves you, and the gamble you make on loving them. Bill lists a series of things that bring people happiness: their noble ancestry, their abilities, wealth or...

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Play Sonnet 92

But do thy worst to steal thyself away, For term of life thou art assured mine; And life no longer than thy love will stay, For it depends upon that love of thine. Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs, When in the least of them my life hath end. I see a better state to me belongs Than that which on thy humour doth depend: Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind, Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie. O what a happy title do I find, Happy to have thy love, happy to die!      But what's so blessed-fair that fears no blot?      Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.   Analysis In Sonnet 92, the poet claims not to care if his lover is untrue, as discovering this will kill him, ridding him of care. Will goads his lover to go ahead...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 100

Where art thou Muse that thou forget'st so long, To speak of that which gives thee all thy might? Spend'st thou thy fury on some worthless song, Darkening thy power to lend base subjects light? Return forgetful Muse, and straight redeem, In gentle numbers time so idly spent; Sing to the ear that doth thy lays esteem And gives thy pen both skill and argument. Rise, resty Muse, my love's sweet face survey, If Time have any wrinkle graven there; If any, be a satire to decay, And make Time's spoils despised every where.      Give my love fame faster than Time wastes life,      So thou prevent'st his scythe and crooked knife.   Analysis Sonnet 100 addresses inspiration, and ponders on immortality in words. Billy asks the unseen Muse why it has been so absent lately, despite writers' ability to give it all its power. He wonders if its squandered its gifts on an unworthy...

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Play Sonnet 101

  O truant Muse what shall be thy amends For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed? Both truth and beauty on my love depends; So dost thou too, and therein dignified. Make answer Muse: wilt thou not haply say, 'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fixed; Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay; But best is best, if never intermixed'? Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb? Excuse not silence so, for't lies in thee To make him much outlive a gilded tomb And to be praised of ages yet to be.      Then do thy office, Muse; I teach thee how      To make him seem, long hence, as he shows now.   Analysis Sonnet 101 sees the poet continue the chastisement of the Muse begun in an earlier sonnet. Billy asks the Muse how she will make up.for her absence and neglect of praise for the fair youth. Truth, beauty, and indeed the Muse herself depend on him....

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 106

  When in the chronicle of wasted time I see descriptions of the fairest wights, And beauty making beautiful old rhyme, In praise of ladies dead and lovely knights, Then, in the blazon of sweet beauty's best, Of hand, of foot, of lip, of eye, of brow, I see their antique pen would have expressed Even such a beauty as you master now. So all their praises are but prophecies Of this our time, all you prefiguring; And for they looked but with divining eyes, They had not skill enough your worth to sing:      For we, which now behold these present days,      Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise.   Analysis Sonnet 106 expresses the poet’s belief that all beauty praised in poetry before this day was presentient praise of the beloved. Will remembers accounts of historic times, and descriptions of very beautiful people, and the beautiful poems inspired by them, in...

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Play Sonnet 107

Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom. The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured, And the sad augurs mock their own presage; Incertainties now crown themselves assured, And peace proclaims olives of endless age. Now with the drops of this most balmy time, My love looks fresh, and Death to me subscribes, Since, spite of him, I'll live in this poor rhyme, While he insults o'er dull and speechless tribes:      And thou in this shalt find thy monument,      When tyrants' crests and tombs of brass are spent. Analysis Sonnet 107 continues the theme of others that the poem itself will survive human mortality, and both the poet and beloved will achieve immortality through it, this time against all odds and maladies. Neither Bill’s own fears nor others’ speculations on his...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 112

Your love and pity doth the impression fill, Which vulgar scandal stamped upon my brow; For what care I who calls me well or ill, So you o'er-green my bad, my good allow? You are my all-the-world, and I must strive To know my shames and praises from your tongue; None else to me, nor I to none alive, That my steeled sense or changes right or wrong. In so profound abysm I throw all care Of others' voices, that my adder's sense To critic and to flatterer stopped are. Mark how with my neglect I do dispense:      You are so strongly in my purpose bred,      That all the world besides methinks y'are dead.   Analysis Sonnet 112 sees the poet hiding from his reputation in the forgiving bosom of his lover. Billy receives such sympathy from the youth that it conceals the badge of shame popular opinion has conferred on his brow....

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Play Sonnet 113

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind; And that which governs me to go about Doth part his function and is partly blind, Seems seeing, but effectually is out; For it no form delivers to the heart Of bird, of flower, or shape which it doth latch: Of his quick objects hath the mind no part, Nor his own vision holds what it doth catch; For if it see the rud'st or gentlest sight, The most sweet favour or deformed'st creature, The mountain or the sea, the day or night, The crow, or dove, it shapes them to your feature.      Incapable of more, replete with you,      My most true mind thus maketh mine eye untrue.   Analysis Sonnet 113 finds a sad poet seeing his distant beloved in everyday things around him. Since he left his beloved, Billy can think of nothing else. His eye no longer sees...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 116

Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove: O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark, That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken. Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom.      If this be error and upon me proved,      I never writ, nor no man ever loved.   Analysis Sonnet 116 explores the purity in a perfect love-match of wits and personalities. Will believes there is no reason why two true minded people shouldn't marry. Love doesn't change with circumstances, instead it holds strong in the face of storms unshaken. It is...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 118

Like as, to make our appetites more keen, With eager compounds we our palate urge; As, to prevent our maladies unseen, We sicken to shun sickness when we purge; Even so, being full of your ne'er-cloying sweetness, To bitter sauces did I frame my feeding; And, sick of welfare, found a kind of meetness To be diseased, ere that there was true needing. Thus policy in love, to anticipate The ills that were not, grew to faults assured, And brought to medicine a healthful state Which, rank of goodness, would by ill be cured;      But thence I learn and find the lesson true,      Drugs poison him that so fell sick of you.   Analysis Sonnet 118 contemplates being sick of the happiness you’re used to, but more miserable in the alternative. Will compares various kinds of purging in this sonnet-- tasting different foods to cleanse the palate, inducing vomiting to cleanse the gut of food poisoning, and he himself switching...

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Play Sonnet 119

  What potions have I drunk of Siren tears, Distilled from limbecks foul as hell within, Applying fears to hopes, and hopes to fears, Still losing when I saw myself to win! What wretched errors hath my heart committed, Whilst it hath thought itself so blessed never! How have mine eyes out of their spheres been fitted, In the distraction of this madding fever! O benefit of ill! now I find true That better is by evil still made better; And ruined love, when it is built anew, Grows fairer than at first, more strong, far greater.      So I return rebuked to my content,      And gain by ill thrice more than I have spent. Analysis Sonnet 119 claims that what doesn’t kill your love affair makes it stronger. Willy has tasted many sweet medicines that were bitter and foul in their creation: He has forced himself to fear optimism and hope against his...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 121

'Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed, When not to be receives reproach of being; And the just pleasure lost, which is so deemed Not by our feeling, but by others' seeing: For why should others' false adulterate eyes Give salutation to my sportive blood? Or on my frailties why are frailer spies, Which in their wills count bad what I think good? No, I am that I am, and they that level At my abuses reckon up their own: I may be straight though they themselves be bevel; By their rank thoughts, my deeds must not be shown;      Unless this general evil they maintain,      All men are bad and in their badness reign.   Analysis In Sonnet 121, the poet condemns hypocrisy and decides he's going to be himself. Bill muses that you’re better off being a bad person than to be known as a bad person despite your inherent...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 123

No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change: Thy pyramids built up with newer might To me are nothing novel, nothing strange; They are but dressings of a former sight. Our dates are brief, and therefore we admire What thou dost foist upon us that is old; And rather make them born to our desire Than think that we before have heard them told. Thy registers and thee I both defy, Not wondering at the present nor the past, For thy records and what we see doth lie, Made more or less by thy continual haste.       This I do vow and this shall ever be;       I will be true despite thy scythe and thee.   Analysis Sonnet 123 addresses the ideas of change and growth in one's lifetime by metaphorically standing up against...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 127

In the old age black was not counted fair, Or if it were, it bore not beauty's name; But now is black beauty's successive heir, And beauty slandered with a bastard shame: For since each hand hath put on Nature's power, Fairing the foul with Art's false borrowed face, Sweet beauty hath no name, no holy bower, But is profaned, if not lives in disgrace. Therefore my mistress' eyes are raven black, Her eyes so suited, and they mourners seem At such who, not born fair, no beauty lack, Sland'ring creation with a false esteem:      Yet so they mourn becoming of their woe,      That every tongue says beauty should look so.   Analysis In Sonnet 127 the speaker finds himself attracted to an unconventional woman, and explains why. Wills thinks that in the past, dark-toned women were not considered beautiful, but now the tables have turned and it is the fair-complexioned that is...

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Play Sonnet 128

How oft when thou, my music, music play'st, Upon that blessed wood whose motion sounds With thy sweet fingers when thou gently sway'st The wiry concord that mine ear confounds, Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap, To kiss the tender inward of thy hand, Whilst my poor lips which should that harvest reap, At the wood's boldness by thee blushing stand! To be so tickled, they would change their state And situation with those dancing chips, O'er whom thy fingers walk with gentle gait, Making dead wood more bless'd than living lips.      Since saucy jacks so happy are in this,      Give them thy fingers, me thy lips to kiss.   Analysis The poet in Sonnet 128 envies a piano's keyboard his lover's attention. Billy watches his lover play music, tickling the keyboard and swaying. When he hears it, he envies the keys her gentle kiss-like touch, hoping for the kiss his...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 133

Beshrew that heart that makes my heart to groan For that deep wound it gives my friend and me! Is't not enough to torture me alone, But slave to slavery my sweet'st friend must be? Me from myself thy cruel eye hath taken, And my next self thou harder hast engrossed: Of him, myself, and thee I am forsaken; A torment thrice three-fold thus to be crossed. Prison my heart in thy steel bosom's ward, But then my friend's heart let my poor heart bail; Whoe'er keeps me, let my heart be his guard; Thou canst not then use rigour in my jail:      And yet thou wilt; for I, being pent in thee,     Perforce am thine, and all that is in me.   Analysis Shakespeare curses his lover for hurting both he and his friend. It wasn’t enough to torture just one of them, but she had to make his friend...

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Play Sonnet 134

So now I have confessed that he is thine, And I my self am mortgaged to thy will, Myself I'll forfeit, so that other mine Thou wilt restore to be my comfort still: But thou wilt not, nor he will not be free, For thou art covetous, and he is kind; He learned but surety-like to write for me, Under that bond that him as fast doth bind. The statute of thy beauty thou wilt take, Thou usurer, that put'st forth all to use, And sue a friend came debtor for my sake; So him I lose through my unkind abuse.      Him have I lost; thou hast both him and me:      He pays the whole, and yet am I not free.   Analysis Sonnet 134 reflects on the situation that the poet and his friend find themselves in due to the entanglement with a dark lover, who it appears has infatuated both of them. Bill has admitted that his lover...

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Play Sonnet 135

Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will, And Will to boot, and Will in over-plus; More than enough am I that vexed thee still, To thy sweet will making addition thus. Wilt thou, whose will is large and spacious, Not once vouchsafe to hide my will in thine? Shall will in others seem right gracious, And in my will no fair acceptance shine? The sea, all water, yet receives rain still, And in abundance addeth to his store; So thou, being rich in Will, add to thy Will One will of mine, to make thy large will more.      Let no unkind, no fair beseechers kill;      Think all but one, and me in that one Will.   Analysis Sonnet 135 is an appeal to a lover after rejection. Here, Will name drops, saying his lady has him, to love or to give the boot, Will for days, so much of him that she is...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Video 137 to Come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 138

When my love swears that she is made of truth, I do believe her though I know she lies, That she might think me some untutored youth, Unlearned in the world's false subtleties. Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young, Although she knows my days are past the best, Simply I credit her false-speaking tongue: On both sides thus is simple truth suppressed: But wherefore says she not she is unjust? And wherefore say not I that I am old? O! love's best habit is in seeming trust, And age in love, loves not to have years told:      Therefore I lie with her, and she with me,      And in our faults by lies we flattered be.   Analysis Sonnet 138 is about the lies we tell ourselves to remain happy. Willy has a mistress who swears to her honesty, and he believes her in spite of knowing its all lies. This...

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O! call not me to justify the wrong That thy unkindness lays upon my heart; Wound me not with thine eye, but with thy tongue: Use power with power, and slay me not by art, Tell me thou lov'st elsewhere; but in my sight, Dear heart, forbear to glance thine eye aside: What need'st thou wound with cunning, when thy might Is more than my o'erpressed defence can bide? Let me excuse thee: ah! my love well knows Her pretty looks have been mine enemies; And therefore from my face she turns my foes, That they elsewhere might dart their injuries:      Yet do not so; but since I am near slain,      Kill me outright with looks, and rid my pain.   Analysis Sonnet 139 explores a jealous lover's desire for honest words, after observing cheating eyes. Billy his mistress not to speak well of her slights against him. He begs her to be honest,...

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Be wise as thou art cruel; do not press My tongue-tied patience with too much disdain; Lest sorrow lend me words, and words express The manner of my pity-wanting pain. If I might teach thee wit, better it were, Though not to love, yet, love to tell me so; As testy sick men, when their deaths be near, No news but health from their physicians know; For, if I should despair, I should grow mad, And in my madness might speak ill of thee; Now this ill-wresting world is grown so bad, Mad slanderers by mad ears believed be.      That I may not be so, nor thou belied,      Bear thine eyes straight, though thy proud heart go wide.   Analysis In sonnet 140, the poet asks his cheating mistress to put up a good front, and appear on the straight and narrow so he's in the dark when she strays. Billy warns his wandrin' woman that the "tongue-tied" patience he...

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   In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes, For they in thee a thousand errors note; But 'tis my heart that loves what they despise, Who, in despite of view, is pleased to dote. Nor are mine ears with thy tongue's tune delighted; Nor tender feeling, to base touches prone, Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invited To any sensual feast with thee alone: But my five wits nor my five senses can Dissuade one foolish heart from serving thee, Who leaves unswayed the likeness of a man, Thy proud heart's slave and vassal wretch to be:      Only my plague thus far I count my gain,      That she that makes me sin awards me pain.   Analysis Sonnet 141 claims there is no logic or sensual admiration to the poet’s love of his subject, but that...

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   Love is my sin, and thy dear virtue hate, Hate of my sin, grounded on sinful loving: O! but with mine compare thou thine own state, And thou shalt find it merits not reproving; Or, if it do, not from those lips of thine, That have profaned their scarlet ornaments And sealed false bonds of love as oft as mine, Robbed others' beds' revenues of their rents. Be it lawful I love thee, as thou lov'st those Whom thine eyes woo as mine importune thee: Root pity in thy heart, that, when it grows, Thy pity may deserve to pitied be.      If thou dost seek to have what thou dost hide,      By self-example mayst thou be denied!   Analysis Sonnet 142 points out to its subject that they and the poet are equally terrible at love, and that the beloved should wise up and get with the poet while the getting is good. Will speaks here to one he loves who...

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Play Sonnet 143

Lo, as a careful housewife runs to catch One of her feathered creatures broke away, Sets down her babe, and makes all swift dispatch In pursuit of the thing she would have stay; Whilst her neglected child holds her in chase, Cries to catch her whose busy care is bent To follow that which flies before her face, Not prizing her poor infant's discontent; So runn'st thou after that which flies from thee, Whilst I thy babe chase thee afar behind; But if thou catch thy hope, turn back to me, And play the mother's part, kiss me, be kind;      So will I pray that thou mayst have thy 'Will,'      If thou turn back and my loud crying still. Analysis Sonnet 142 chides the beloved for ignoring the poet and chasing some trivial thing. Billy compares his lady’s actions to that of a housewife chasing a chicken. A housewife sets down her...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 145

  Those lips that Love's own hand did make, Breathed forth the sound that said 'I hate', To me that languished for her sake: But when she saw my woeful state, Straight in her heart did mercy come, Chiding that tongue that ever sweet Was used in giving gentle doom; And taught it thus anew to greet; 'I hate' she altered with an end, That followed it as gentle day, Doth follow night, who like a fiend From heaven to hell is flown away.      'I hate', from hate away she threw,      And saved my life, saying 'not you'.   Analysis Sonnet 145 chronicles a cyclical relationship between a paranoid man and the woman he loves soothing him. Billy boy is so in love with a woman that hearing her say that "she hates" something immediately creates a fear that she is referring to him. But then when she notices how much pain she has caused him by saying that she may potentially...

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Play Sonnet 146

  Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth, these rebel powers that thee array; Why dost thou pine within and suffer dearth, Painting thy outward walls so costly gay? Why so large cost, having so short a lease, Dost thou upon thy fading mansion spend? Shall worms, inheritors of this excess, Eat up thy charge? Is this thy body's end? Then soul, live thou upon thy servant's loss, And let that pine to aggravate thy store; Buy terms divine in selling hours of dross; Within be fed, without be rich no more: So shall thou feed on Death, that feeds on men, And Death once dead, there's no more dying then. Analysis In Sonnet 146 the addresses to his soul a pleading appeal to value inner qualities and satisfaction rather than outward appearance. Billy asks his soul why it allows his exterior vanity to cause him such inner misery. Souls...

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My love is as a fever longing still, For that which longer nurseth the disease; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve Desire is death, which physic did except. Past cure I am, now Reason is past care, And frantic-mad with evermore unrest; My thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth vainly expressed;      For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,      Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.   Analysis Sonnet 147 compares being in an abusive love affair to an illness you make no attempt to cure. Willy longs sickly for his lady, who causes him the distress he suffers. He consumes her like tainted food which his malady makes him crave, prolonging his illness in a...

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Play Sonnet 148

O me! what eyes hath Love put in my head, Which have no correspondence with true sight; Or, if they have, where is my judgment fled, That censures falsely what they see aright? If that be fair whereon my false eyes dote, What means the world to say it is not so? If it be not, then love doth well denote Love's eye is not so true as all men's: no, How can it? O! how can Love's eye be true, That is so vexed with watching and with tears? No marvel then, though I mistake my view; The sun itself sees not, till heaven clears.      O cunning Love! with tears thou keep'st me blind,      Lest eyes well-seeing thy foul faults should find.   Analysis Sonnet 148 ponders the effect of love on our vision, both literal and figurative. Will wonders aloud what love has done to his eyes that prevents him from...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Video 150 to come

You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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Play Sonnet 151

Love is too young to know what conscience is, Yet who knows not conscience is born of love? Then, gentle cheater, urge not my amiss, Lest guilty of my faults thy sweet self prove: For, thou betraying me, I do betray My nobler part to my gross body's treason; My soul doth tell my body that he may Triumph in love; flesh stays no farther reason, But rising at thy name doth point out thee, As his triumphant prize. Proud of this pride, He is contented thy poor drudge to be, To stand in thy affairs, fall by thy side.      No want of conscience hold it that I call      Her love, for whose dear love I rise and fall.   Analysis Sonnet 151 explores a man's powerlessness in the face of his carnal responses. Willy admonishes his lover, asking her to not accuse him of sin, since she might find herself guilty of the...

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  In loving thee thou know'st I am forsworn, But thou art twice forsworn, to me love swearing; In act thy bed-vow broke, and new faith torn, In vowing new hate after new love bearing: But why of two oaths' breach do I accuse thee, When I break twenty? I am perjured most; For all my vows are oaths but to misuse thee, And all my honest faith in thee is lost: For I have sworn deep oaths of thy deep kindness, Oaths of thy love, thy truth, thy constancy; And, to enlighten thee, gave eyes to blindness, Or made them swear against the thing they see;      For I have sworn thee fair; more perjured eye,      To swear against the truth so foul a lie!   Analysis In Sonnet 152, the poet tells his mistress how he judges her, but then he realizes that he as well has been sinful. Bill admits...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...

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You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need. -King Lear                                                                            ...